Cleanses are still bullshit

batmancleanses

Slap the toxins right out of your mouth

 

“Rid your body of toxins”… “Jumpstart your metabolism!”… “7 days to a flatter stomach!”… Sounds great, doesn’t it? The thing is… It’s bullshit. As nice as it would be to be able to “get a flat stomach in 7 days”, or to “jumpstart your metabolism” – things aren’t that simple, and frankly, they don’t work that way. Juicing, cleanses, detoxes, free radicals – oh my! It’s no wonder that in today’s world people tend to believe in these products when the companies that sell them do such a great job marketing them by preying on people’s fears and emotions. Here’s the thing, you don’t have to fall for it.

Let’s go over a few things real quick. First, let’s outline some information that will help understand just exactly why these things are bogus.

  • Toxins & Free Radicals: Ever notice how whenever the word “toxin” is used, no one can identify what toxin/toxins they’re specifically talking about? It’s usually more of a generalization. Free radicals, on the other hand, are a bit more specific, but still pretty generalized.

What people buying these products don’t know, is that the human body has a “detox system” built into it already! Your renal and digestive system (kidneys & liver specifically) do a FINE job of “ridding your body of toxins”. Furthermore, your body produces antioxidants to deal with free radicals. So if you’re drinking enough water and eating a reasonable amount of fruits and veggies – you’re probably good.

  • Weight loss: I’m talking about real, sustainable weight loss. It takes time! Losing body fat requires you to be in a caloric deficit (burning more calories/day than you consume). At best, you can expect to safely lose about 1-2Lbs/week of body fat depending on the individual.

So with these bits of information in mind, let’s quickly examine these “detoxes” and “cleanses”. First off, do they work, and if so, how?

  • Cleanses/Detoxes work primarily by putting the person in a heavy caloric deficit (good right? Not exactly…) The issue with this is that typically the reduction in calories is so great, that once that person starts eating food again, their weight will creep right back up to where it was before. So in other words, not sustainable. Some even use diuretic herbs to help “cleanse the body” of demons, taco bell, and other toxins. So all of that water weight you shed will be coming right back once you’re no longer running to the toilet every 30-45mins. Sounds like fun!…
  • Real, sustainable weight loss takes time and effort. PERIOD! Repeat after me, there are no shortcuts, there are no magic pills or Brazilian fruit juices that will give you a six pack, or make you look 15 years younger. Those things require consistency, dedication, time, effort, and probably a time machine. Again, you need to be in a caloric deficit in order to lose weight and drop body fat. This, combined with a quality exercise program or an adequate amount of daily activity – is what will coax the body in a healthy direction. Remember, to keep the weight off you need to do so in a rational and safe manner. This combined with an appropriate lifestyle adjustment will help ensure success. Not sexy, but it’s the truth.

So do yourself a favor. The next time you consider paying for a cleanse or a detox, save yourself the time, money and suffering, and spend it on something useful – like food and water. Eat your fruits and veggies, get your protein, don’t fear carbohydrates – you need those for energy, and consume healthy fats. If you have any more questions about losing body fat and increasing lean muscle mass, let me know!

     Justin

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The Hip Hinge:

When it comes to being a “functional badass”, there are many ways to display the various qualities that showcase the body’s ability to perform.  In the world of “functional fitness”, it’s easy to lose sight of the fundamentals.  It may look impressive to see some poor soul pistol squatting on a kettlebell while simultaneously doing a dumbbell curl with one hand, and an overhead press in the other; but that doesn’t have much carryover to the real world.  Unless of course, you work for Cirque du soleil.  As much as Planet Fitness loves to mock strength, (or anything remotely related to strength for that matter), “picking stuff up and putting it down” is in fact, incredibly beneficial!  Man or woman, it doesn’t matter.  Getting stronger is good for you, regardless of what sport or activities you engage in.

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So much room for activities!

If you are going to engage in picking up heavy stuff regularly, and you should – then you need to do it correctly. Hint – it doesn’t involve standing on a Bosu… As you may have guessed from the title, I’m talking about… THE HIP HINGE!

The hip hinge is the most powerful movement a human can do, it’s the apex movement of an apex hunter– Dan John.

The hip hinge is one of the most beneficial movement patterns that we should be utilizing in everyday life. Everyone should master this movement, for a number of reasons.

–  Hip hinging is a requisite for athletic movement & performance
–  The hip hinge allows for maximal activation and utilization of the posterior chain; and can help bring balance between the anterior & posterior chain
–  It allows for loads to be lifted with the hips, while sparing the knees and the spine (when done correctly)
–  It can increase hamstring flexibility
–  When done quickly and explosively, it’s incredibly effective for burning fat
–  Hip hinging is generally much easier to master and perform than the squat
–  Hip hinging is corrective
–  Learning the hip hinge will allow you to deadlift, and therefore become superhuman, and super sexy.

The list goes on and on…

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Ovechkin single leg hinging like a boss.

Before you go and grab a barbell or kettlebell, lets take a look at something that’s vital to this movement. Core stability! Your spine will thank you, and chances are that if you work a desk job, you could use the help.

Deadbugs:

Deadbugs are a great core stabilization exercise. You begin by laying on your back, keeping your back flat against the floor. Keep your hips and knees bent. Extend one leg while keeping the static leg from drawing in towards the chest. The objective here it to avoid extension of the spine (excessive arching of the lower back), so make sure your lower back is flat against the floor, and your “ribcage is down”.

Planks:

Planks are about recruitment, not endurance. There is little reason if any to hold a plank for any ridiculous period of time. Make sure to contract the glutes, quads, abdominals, lats, and shoulders maximally.

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Stir the Pot:

From the brilliant Dr. Stuart McGill.  What we’re going for here is a neutral/stable spine.  Using the swiss ball challenges the core musculature’s ability to stabilize the spine – and you need that!  Placing your elbows on a swiss ball, make small smooth circles while keeping the rest of your body still.  Eventually, try to make the circles larger.

Now lets get into some hinging! There are many progressions, regressions, and ways to learn and coach the hip hinge.

The Dowel Method:

For beginners the dowel method can work well. The dowel method is great because it provides instant kinesthetic feedback. Here are a few pointers for performing it:

–  Start with a symmetrical shoulder width stance
–  Holding the dowel behind you, make sure your body contacts the dowel at three points (the head, upper back, and lower back)
–  One of your hands should be holding the dowel at the small of your neck and the other at the small of the lower back
–  Maintain contact at the three points (head, upper and lower back)
–  Keep abdominals braced (as if you were about to be punched in the stomach)
–  Initiate the movement by bending at the waist and sitting your hips back behind you
–  Keep your shins vertical throughout the movement, allowing the knees to bend only to allow for the hips to sit back
–  Squeeze the glutes to return the torso to the upright position

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Once you’ve mastered the basic hip hinge pattern, you can advance to a loaded version of the movement – the kettlebell Romanian deadlift.

Kettlebell Romanian Deadlift:

The kettlebell RDL (Romanian DeadLift) is a nice progression for a beginner who doesn’t possess any profound limitations in motor control or mobility/stability. If you do have issues getting into a proper deadlifting position, don’t worry; the movement can be easily scaled as you work towards improving your limitations. You can perform the KB RDL on a step, yoga block, or plyo-box to shorten up the range of motion. Simply place the kettlebell on one of these options and perform the lift. If you’re still struggling with the movement after adding these implements, then you’ll need to address those deficiencies first.

Here are some tips:

–  Stand over the kettlebell with a symmetrical hip-width stance
–  Line up the midpoint of the feet with the handle of the KB
–  Brace the core, keep the spine neutral and the back straight throughout the movement
–  Send the hips back, keeping the shins vertical
–  Reach down to grasp the handle of the KB (you should feel the hips & hamstrings “turn on” at this point)
–  Squeeze glutes and push the feet into the floor (emphasis on heels and mid-foot) as you stand up
–  Finish with a strong squeeze of the glutes at the top before lowering the kettlebell

Alright, so now you’ve got the basic hip hinge pattern down. Lets move onto another incredible movement – the Kettlebell Swing!

Kettlebell Swing:

The kettlebell swing is an explosive movement that is capable of building strength and improving conditioning. It does much more than that though.  The recruitment of the posterior chain and the core strength and stability that are needed make this exercise very demanding, but also insanely beneficial.  Not only that, but kettlebell swings are a great alternative to the much more technical Olympic lifts.

In a study conducted by Stuart McGill it was noted that “Some unique loading patterns discovered during the kettlebell swing included the posterior shear of the L4 vertebra on L5, which is opposite in polarity to a traditional lift. Thus, quantitative analysis provides an insight into why many individuals credit kettlebell swings with restoring and enhancing back health and function, although a few find that they irritate tissues.”  If they’re good enough for the king of back health, they’re good enough for me.

Here’s a video by Tony Gentilcore on the kettlebell swing:

TonyGentilcore.com Cleaning Up Kettlebell Swing T…: http://youtu.be/xWgl1rEiCeQ

So there you have it.  These are just a few examples of what learning how to hip hinge can do for you.  More importantly, if you’re someone who is performing this movement incorrectly day in and day out, then low back pain is likely to be a result eventually.  It’s best to understand how to perform basic human movements correctly since most of us do these things fairly often.  Not only that, but correctly learning how to hip hinge will allow you to work with a multitude of wonderful strength tools such as barbells, dumbbells, kettlebells, bands, ect.  Put simply, there is a bunch of valuable carryover that this movement will provide you with.

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References:

McGill, S. M., & Marshall, L. W. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21997449

Pick up something heavy.

The Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex, Part 1:

Today I’m fortunate enough to have my very first guest post by someone who I respect and admire in this industry – my brother, Brandon McCary. Brandon is a Rehab Specialist who holds certifications with NASM (PES), Functional Movement Systems (Level-2 FMS Expert), and ISSA (SSN) – just to name a few.
If you’re a trainer, than this is a great post for you. So with that, enjoy!
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The Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex, Part 1.
The core is comprised of two stabilization systems, the local and global core systems. The core is made up of muscles and connective tissues of the lumbar spine, pelvic girdle, and hip joint, which constitutes the Lumbo-Pelvic-Hip Complex. The core is where the body’s center of gravity is located and where all movement originates. Active individuals with a stable core can prevent abdominal tears, by activating the local core prior to extremity movement, such as during a soccer strike.

 

 

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A neuromuscularly efficient core is needed in order to have optimal neuromuscular control of the human movement system. A stable, strong, and powerful firing core prevents injury and allows for acceleration, deceleration, and stabilization during dynamic movements.

 

 

File:Plank on a pair of medicine balls.jpg

 

 

The Local Stabilization System The primary muscles that make up the local stabilization system are the diaphragm, transverse abdominis, internal obliques, multifidus, and pelvic floor musculature. The local core muscles attachdirectly to the vertebrae. These deep muscles of the spine are primarily slow twitch muscle fibers, fibers with optimal endurance for maintaining posture and respiration. Muscle spindles are abundant among the local core muscles, muscle spindles are sensory receptors which detect the rate of change in muscle length.Inline image 5
Intervertebral Stability (deep stiffness) 

Intervertebral Stability (IVS) is only possible through training both types of intervertebral stiffness. The first type of stiffness is achieved by co-contraction of the transverse abdominus and multifidus by performing an exercise known as “Drawing-In”. Next up, performing exercises that increase intra-abdominal pressure, like “Belly Breathing” will also increase IVS. These exercises can be progressing through three different postures: Fundamental, Transitional, and Functional. A great example of transitional phase belly breathing is in the sphinx position (more on this cool stuff in part 2). By having both forms of core stiffness trained, you will have 100% local core stability achieved, which allows for optimal IVS, which then limits excessive compressive, shear, and rotational forces between spinal segments.

 

Core Stabilization Mechanisms The core is also stabilized during functional movement by two core stabilization mechanisms, one being the fascial nextwork that acts as an auxiliary core stabilizer by dynamic engagement, the thoracolumbar fascia mechanism. The second auxiliary core stabilizing mechanism is the intra-abdominal pressure mechanism, which activates the diaphragm and pelvic floor.

Inspiration and Expiration

Inspiration and expiration is also achieved via local core activation. The muscles required for inspiration and elevation of the ribs are your “principal” and “accessory” muscles. The principal muscles are the diaphragm, external intercostals, and the accessory muscles are the scalene group, sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis minor. The muscles required for expiration and rib depression are your “active breathing” and “quiet breathing” muscles. The active breathing muscles are the internal intercostals, abdominals and quadratus lumborum. As for quiet breathing, the expiration results from passive, elastic recoil of the lungs, rib cage, and diaphragm.


 

Diaphragm, Intra-abdominal Pressure, Pelvo-
Ocular Reflex

 

 

 

The “roof” of the local core, is the diaphragm. Since the diaphragm is located between the thoracic and abdominal cavities, learning to build intra-abdominal pressure will cause diaphragmatic elevation and pelvic floor contraction, which allows for decreased compressive forces across spinal segments. Simply being able to contract your diaphragm can help you prevent injury, and produce optimal movement! Learning to breathe with the diaphragm/abdomen rather than the chest/accessory musculature is extremely useful in pain relief and performance. Chest breathing can actually alter your head position due to the hypertonic/tight accessory neck muscles. The “pelvo-ocular reflex” theorized that one’s head position can have an effect on one’s pelvic position. If your head migrates forward, the pelvis reflexively rotates anteriorly to readjust one’s center of gravity, which will cause even further problems with thoracolumbar fascia pain of the low back. In part 2, exercises for diaphragmatic breathing and both the local, and global core will be discussed.
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Thoracolumbar Fascia Mechanism 
The thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) is a fascial network of noncontractile tissue that is engaged dynamically by contractile tissues that attach to it, such as the erector spinae, multifidus, transverse abdominis, internal oblique, gluteus maximus, latissimus dorsi, and quadratus lumborum. Training the local core achieves increased spinal stiffness/stability which decreases translational and rotational stress at the spine. The multifidus is the local core’s multisegmental “spinal glue”, and from the cervical region all the way down to the sacral region, the multifidus runs deep within each spinal segment, stabilizing each facet joint from the neck to the tailbone.

 

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Pelvic Floor Mechanism, Stress Incontinence 

 

 

The pelvic floor is considered the “floor” of the local core, and is activated when intra-abdominal pressure is present. Having weak pelvic floor musculature is common among adults, unfortunately, if it goes unnoticed for too long, pelvic floor dysfunction can set in. Also, common among females is stress incontinence, but the good news is, it can be easily treated with core stability exercises and functional movements. The deep squat exercise is actually great for recruiting the pelvic floor, and should be part of ones rehab program once local core stability has been worked on.

 

 

 

  The Global Stabilization System

The global core muscles are the quadratus lumborum, psoas major, external/internal obliques, rectus abdominis, gluteus medius, and adductor musculature. These muscles transfer loads between the upper and lower extremity and provide stability between the pelvis and spine.

Lumbo-Pelvic Stability (superficial stiffness) 

 

 

By simultaneously activating the abdominals (rectus abdominis), lower back (quadratus lumborum), buttock (gluteus medius) at the same time, you achieve what is called co-contraction of superficial musculature of the spine, which is known as an exercise called, “bracing”. Just like with drawing-in and belly breathing, there are also three different postures for core bracing: Fundamental, Transitional, and Functional. When the muscles are contracting, they are increasing stiffness between the spine and pelvis. A great example of a functional brace is when you stand up from squatting, and simultaneously brace the abs, low back and glutes in effort to stabilize the lumbar spine (the thoracolumbar fascia mechanism also has a role in this).

 

Optimal Movement Optimal neuromuscular control of movement is made up of several factors. We are already learned the local and global core systems role in movement, now it’s time to learn what other factors need to be considered for optimal movement.

 

 

 File:Muybridge disk step walk.jpg1. Length-Tension Relationships

Having an optimal gamma efferent system, which is achieved by having optimal force generation in relation to a muscles “tone”. Neurologically, normal muscles aren’t hypertonic (overactive/tight) or hypotonic (underactive/weak+tight). For ex. When running, having the ability to generate force/tension in the hamstrings without spasticity (muscle spasm) occuring!

 

 

 

 File:Lion stretching at Ouwehands 2010.JPG2. Force-Couple Relationships

Another necessary factor for having optimal neuromuscular control is having normal force-coupling relationships, or the ability to activate groups of muscles at once. A great example would be during a baseball pitcher’s throw, the upper and lower trapezius muscles have to activate together in order to stabilize scapular upward rotation.

 

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3. Joint Arthokinematics (Joint Centration) Lastly, having normal joint arthokinematics is the ability to maintain joint position through all planes of motion, for ex. as seen in the photo below, the ball and socket joint-the shoulder joint should be able to move from flexion to extension without the humeral head gliding anteriorly.

 

 

 

 4. Buttressing Your Truss (Spinal Stability)

 

As the eminent Biomechanist, Dr. Stuart McGill once said, “Create a truss”. Think of your core as a stable bridge, the deeper the truss, the more stable the bridge! How do we make our core “deep” in effort to become more stable? We train not only the global/superficial core, but also the local/deep core! When both core systems are stabilized, we then have….optimal Spinal Stability! Intervertebral Stability + Lumbo-Pelvic Stability = Spinal Stability
Inline image 1Inline image 2Finally…Optimal Neuromuscular Control!

All of these factors: spinal stability, length-tension relationships, force-couple relationships, and joint arthokinematics have to be normal in order for there to be symmetrical, powerful, and optimal movement!

 

 

 

 File:Eadweard Muybridge 2.gifNext up!  

In part 2, the local core, “drawing-in/belly breathing” exercise progressions, and static/dynamic global core “bracing” exercise progressions will be discussed, and demonstrated.